Office Singer Photo -4-16-10

Simon Singer

Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Northeastern University

Areas of Expertise

  • Adolescent offenders
  • Juvenile justice
  • Prisoner reentry
  • Violent crime

Key Findings

  • Adolescence is an important time full of internal frustration and status-anxiety for teens. MORE
  • White-collar crime is associated with adults, but these adults begin crafting their skills much earlier in life. In his study, Singer collected data on cheating in school, an indicator of white-collar delinquency. MORE
  • Juvenile offenders are not given the same punishments as adult offenders because Supreme Court Rulings determined that sentencing juveniles to death was cruel and unusual punishment. MORE
  • Adolescent males from wealthy upbringings in suburban neighborhoods have the highest rates of white-collar delinquency and cheating. MORE
  • Adolescent offenses can be put off as ‘kids being kids’, but long-time offenses build up and can indicate trends. MORE
  • Location and prior offense record affects juvenile justice. MORE
  • Internal emotional imbalances and external pressures in adolescence contribute to juvenile violence incidents. MORE

Biography

Simon Singer, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University, is an expert in adolescent offender and juvenile justice.

Singer has consulted with the National Institute of Justice and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. He published two award-winning books, America’s Safest City: Delinquency and Modernity in Suburbia, recipient of the ASC 2015 Michael J. Hindelang Award, andRecriminalizing Delinquency: Violent Juvenile Crime and Juvenile, recipient of the ASA Albert J. Reiss Distinguished Scholar Award. His most recent book received the 2016 Prose Award from the Association of American Publishers (AAP) Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division.

He has been published in numerous academic journals and has contributed dozens of articles and book chapters.

Singer received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania